Archive for the ‘fiction novel’ Category

Crenshaw

7 September, 2018

MyBetterHalf started a family book club (her third book club)… It is weird because it’s a book club where people actually read the book, and don’t hang out in a bar. LOL! (Hi, sweetie, thanxies for reading GBAtT)

Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate.

I like how it deals with big topics, being homeless. Two pieces of bad luck, and the family is seriously poor. I do not envy the family, it appears, even though they got a bit of good news to end the story…they still are living precariously, paycheck-to-paycheck, and it doesn’t help the father is too proud to ask for help. I like the attitude of the main character, he likes facts, which doesn’t go well with him having an imaginary friend, and even in his bad situation, he realizes other kids have it worse.

Ms Applegate wrote One And Only Ivan, which I also enjoyed.

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Family Life – Akhil Sharma

21 July, 2018

this book is very life like: as in meandering, without a plot, and chaotic. Filled with sections of boring, descriptions of the mundane, and inconsistent characters.

  • kid has conversations with god…could be interesting, but only lasted a few pages
  • kid has first girl friend…could be interesting, but only lasted a few pages
  • dad becomes alcoholic…and a few pages later has recovered
  • Last two pages…. and I quote, because there are no spoilers in a story without a plot: “I didn’t know Hema well, but I took her to a resort in Mexico….The happiness was almost heavy. That was when I knew I had a problem.”
  • That’s it. The whole book is about unhappy life, because his family is dealing with living in a new country. AND his family is living with oldest son tragically brain damaged suddenly. But we end the book by protagonist suddenly becoming happy.

I don’t get it – Akhil Sharma is a professor of creative writing.

I don’t get it – evidently NYT Book Review listed this as top ten books of 2014.

SIDE NOTE: I hear by give permission to MyBetterHalf and MyChildrens to allow me to die if I am in a brain damaged coma and cannot respond.

Wolf Hollow

8 July, 2018

…and when MyBetterHalf and the childrens were away for the Fourth of July, I read “Wolf Hollow” By Lauren E. Wolk.

It was a quick, good read.

I’m hoping one of my childrens will read it, and we can chat.

The People of Sparks – Jeanne DuPrau

19 February, 2018

well… MrG said he wanted to read the next book after City of Ember… and, well, I finished it off in a few days.

Fun read.

Weird thing… the book, from 2004, dealing with the question “what should we do with refugees?” still seems relevant today. I liked how both sides, had pretty valid common sense points of “we need to keep our people safe”.

And remember kids, in agriculture, you have good years, and you have bad years.

Out Of My Mind – Sharon M Draper

13 February, 2018

Out Of My Mind by Sharon M Draper.

MsS and MrG both read and liked this book. I liked it too. The parents were completely true, making parenting mistakes, yelling at kids for the wrong reasons. The kids were realistic. Maybe that’s the sad part of the story of Melody, the main character who can not talk, is how realistic everyone is in their interactions with her.

 

 

 

City of Ember

5 February, 2018

City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau.

An entertaining read. Most fun part though has been talking with MrG aboot it.

I liked the reference to the Irish Potato Famine, tossed in the middle.

Something besides sports for discussion!

 

Out of Nowhere

2 December, 2017

Out of Nowhere by Maria Padian

I must have liked it, because when I got to the half-way point, I kept reading until I finished it at 2AM.  There were some great descriptions of soccer games.

Between Shades of Gray

28 June, 2017

Ruta Sepetys’s Between Shades of Gray

“When the rest of the world finds out what the Soviets are doing, they will put an end to all of this.”  

A story of a young girl, trying to survive, during WW2, when the Soviets sent her and her family to Siberia. I’m glad I read it. It is a good read, a quick read. I am also glad that I read while the sun was shining, and not during the gloom of winter.

I recommend.

 

 

 

Under a Graveyard Sky

9 June, 2017

Love the title of John Ringo’s Under a Graveyard Sky.

Zombie book, so it had that in it’s favor. It was entertainment. I will agree with someone who said “as if Tom Clancy wrote a zombie apocalypse”. Well crafted, well researched. A bit politically condescending at times, and I notice because I don’t really agree with his politics, LOL. The good guys are saints, the liberals are fools. And all that training you did with your kids and their guns pay off.

It is a amusing that the commander is sending his 15 year old daughter into combat, and doesn’t seem that worried about it. Maybe I’m a wimp, but I worry when I send my kids across the street to check the mail. But maybe in a zombie apocalypse you realize that we are already dead, and the only chance we have is by being fearless.

They live on boats for months, but somehow don’t run out of food…or toilet paper.

One important lesson from the book, after missions, they would have an immediate debrief, what went wrong? what can we do better?  Nothing personal, all could bring up points, all were listened to. Every team should do that. But I bet, many cases, after a game most folks either want to point fingers after a loss, or bask in the glory after a win. (I recently learned the German generals during WW1 were great at sharing lessons learned with their colleagues.)

 

Walk Two Moons

14 May, 2017

finished up the family book club book, Sharon Creech’s “Walk Two Moons”

I had to pause reading it, because I didn’t feel like crying at a restaurant, just saying.

There was a sentence that I liked, I shared with MrG and he liked it too: “We walked through the tiny living room into the miniature kitchen and upstairs into my father’s pint-sized bedroom and on into my pocket-sized bedroom and into the wee bathroom.”

A good book.